The Auburn University College of Agriculture hosts its 10th annual Ag Week April 6-10. Throughout the week, a variety of activities with a state fair theme will highlight and celebrate agriculture and Auburn University’s agricultural heritage.

Auburn University and the Auburn community are invited to enjoy the following events, all of which are open to the public and free of charge.

  • Monday, April 6 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., the college will host a petting zoo on the green space beside Auburn University’s Student Center.
  • Tuesday, April 7 from 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. the college invites the Auburn community, faculty, staff and students to attend an old-fashioned carnival at Agricultural Heritage Park, located off S. Donahue Drive between Samford Avenue and Lem Morrison Drive. The event will feature carnival games, free food, a bouncy slide, mechanical bull and a dunk tank. Pie baking and hotdog eating competitions will take place during the carnival.
  • Wednesday, April 8, the annual Picnic on Ag Hill will begin at 11 a.m. on the front lawn of Comer Hall. Fried catfish and chicken plates will sell for $5, as they remain available. Clyde the Camel will also be on site for Hump Day photo opportunities.
  • Thursday, April 9 from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., Breakfast on the Concourse will take place on Haley Concourse. At 5:30 p.m. in the Foy Hall Ballroom, the college will host Monsanto Company’s Vance Crowe at the What’s Your Work? lecture. Crowe, Monsanto’s director of millennial engagement, will challenge listeners with the question, “What do you want to accomplish with your life’s work?”

In addition, on Friday, April 10, Auburn-area kindergarten students will head to campus for the final event for the week, Get Agtive. The students will participate in games and hands-on activities as they learn where their food, fuel and fiber come from. This is an invitation-only event.

“As students, we look forward to Ag Week every year because it’s an opportunity for us to share our passion with the Auburn community,” Sarah Stephenson, Ag Council vice president said. “We know what those who work in the agricultural industry do every day in order to feed this growing and hungry world, and it’s important that we get that word out. We want people to understand how important this industry is not only on a state level, but on a national and global level as well.”

To follow what’s happening during Ag Week 2015 or to learn more about the week’s events, like the Auburn University Ag Council on Facebook.