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Agricultural Business
& Economics Major

Congressman Mike Rogers, who represents Alabama in the U.S. House of Representatives, spoke to students in the Agricultural Law class, October 22, 2020

As a student in agricultural business and economics, you’ll fully tap into the diversity and complexity of today’s agriculture through extensive training in business, agricultural science and biology. You’ll learn how each of these fields influences our industry.

What you’ll Study

The agricultural business and economics major includes a variety of courses to prepare you to enter the many different careers available in the business and agricultural industries.

In your first two years, you’ll take business courses such as Microeconomics, Financial Accounting, Macroeconomics, Managerial Accounting and Statistics, as well as other core courses that will provide the knowledge base necessary for your advanced agricultural economics classes. As you progress through your four years, you’ll take Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness Marketing, Agricultural Law, Resource Economics, Agricultural Business Management, Agricultural Policies and Trade, Farm Management and Agricultural Prices.

A number of professional and agricultural electives are available to help you tailor your education in specific ways. Some students choose emphases in management, marketing or finance. Others choose to train in management and decision-making at the farm level, along with the technical aspects of production agriculture.

Many in our program choose to concentrate their studies around resource scarcity and environmental and rural development issues that have become critical. Public institutions that steward and safeguard our natural and human resources are primary employers in these areas.

Major Curriculum & Requirements

To cope with the diversity and complexity of today’s agriculture, men and women need strong backgrounds in the business and economic concepts that relate to agriculture, agribusiness, marketing, and the management of natural resources. Also, a technical knowledge of agriculture and a broad-based background in the life sciences is highly desired by employers. Such training is available in Auburn University’s Agricultural Business and Economics curriculum (AGEC), which is administered by the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology.

What can I do with a Major in Agriculture Business & Economics?

As a graduate of this program, you will be prepared for a variety of careers in agribusiness, the financial sector or other private or government organizations.

Whether you are interested in agribusiness, farming, finance and credit, government service, resource and environmental economics, international agriculture, education, or your own business, this program offers opportunities for you.

  • Banking & Finance
  • Business Development
  • Lobbying
  • Law & Public Policy
  • Production Management
  • Agribusiness
  • Commodity Buying
  • Community Development
  • Insurance
  • Operations Management

Find out more careers you can have with your major by visiting our Career Discovery services page.

ALUMNI STORIES

Hear directly from our successful alumni out in the real world. Read our Alumni Stories.

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Contact

Agricultural Economics & Rural Sociology Dept.
202 Comer Hall
Auburn Univ, AL 36849
334-844-4800

Ashley B. Aston
Academic Advisor
212 Comer Hall
Auburn Univ, AL 36849
334-844-5604

Joseph Molnar
Professor, Co-director of the Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Sociology
301 Comer Hall
Auburn Univ, AL 36849
(334) 844-5615
molnajj@auburn.edu

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